Film Review : The Hobbit : The Desolation of Smaug

Andrew Stephens, Friday the 3rd of January, 2014 in Fantasy, Films

The barrel escape from The Hobbit This post was automatically imported from my old sandfly.net.nz blog. It may look a little weird since it was not originally written for this format.

After I reviewed all the Hobbit films:
An Unexpected Journey
The Desolation of Smaug
The Battle of the Five Armies
negotiating the Misty Mountains, Bilbo Baggins and the party of dwarves make their way to the Lonely Mountain and their date with a dragon, pursued constantly by a band of murderous orcs hellbent on killing Thorin Oakensheild and adding some urgency to what would otherwise be a gentle stroll of a plot.

Another year, another Hobbit film. I was pretty lukewarm about the first film (my review), it was OK but seemed like a really good 90 minute film crammed into 3 hours. The Hobbit : The Desolation of Smaug (HobDoS) is also almost 3 hours long but I am glad to say that it hangs together a lot better and some clever choices have been made in what to add to bulk up the plot.

The Hobbit was never a story that would support 9 hours of film, it is a thin book, episodic and repetitive in nature as befits a story designed to be read to sleepy children. The producers of the films have had to scratch around to additional material to pad out time and to make the films fit in stylistically with the Lord of the Rings movies. In the first Hobbit film, this meant stretching out the fight scenes with the goblins to a ridiculous degree and adding some tediously canonical foreshadowing that made no sense unless you already knew the story. Somewhere during production of HobDos the decision was made to just start inventing new stuff and the film is much better for it. The journey through the elvish kingdom is enlivened by an unlikely love triangle and Laketown becomes an impoverished city of political intrigue.

The additions are all a little Shakespearean and make for entertaining viewing. What the new stuff isn't is very Tolkenesque, and the seams show when scenes that are taken verbatim from the book (Bilbo talking with the dragon) are juxtaposed with 21st century comedy action fare (the dwarfs battle plan) and the horror styling of Gandalf's pointless side quest. The over-the-top action scenes are still very long and sometime nonsensical but they do not outstay their welcome so much this time around.

Once again, I got sucked into paying extra for the high frame-rate 3D version. The 3D is very subtle this time around and I didn't notice any problems with the high frame rate although I don't know whether that is due to changes in the process, the crew learning how to light scenes for the new cameras, or just me getting used to the way it looks.

HobDos is an improvement on the first film and I enjoyed it.